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Tips to Find a Summer Job That Benefits Your Major

by Doris Hall (2019-09-13)


The summer is a time for rest and relaxation; the burden of class schedules and write a paper for me are gone for the next three months. However, the summer is also an opportunity to build your future. While you might have a break from studying and writing papers, you should still be thinking about how to build your resume beyond your GPA. Here are a few tips to help you gain meaningful employment during those lazy summer months, while simultaneously aiding you in your quest for experience within your major:

Be a regular at your school's career center
A good place to start your search for a summer job relevant to your field is to go to your school's career center. You may think of the career center as a place to find a full-time job after graduation, but it also helps students find employment and internships while they're still in school. Talking to the counselors there can help you decide which jobs would be most beneficial for what you are trying to do. It's also a great way to make professional connections. Being referred to a position through a prestigious university can make you stand out on a list of potential employees. It's important to make these connections early so that you can get a leg up in the job market before graduating.

Talk to your professors
While they are most notably your instructors during class time, your professors are also a good source for finding available positions within your field. They've been in your shoes before as students themselves, and they have a wealth of experience about what it's like looking for a position relative to their studies. As the saying goes, ¨it's not what you know, it's who you know." While maintaining a 3.0 or greater GPA is crucial, having professional contacts and connections within the job market can give you an advantage over those who don't.

Stay on good terms with your current employer
If you are already working, it is important to remain on good terms with your current employer. Recommendations are important for your future position, whether it is within the company or within another. Being on good terms with your employer on your way out leaves a good impression; it demonstrates humility and a good work ethic, which are often characteristics sought by future employers. As previously mentioned, it is important to maintain those professional connections, as they are invaluable for opening doors in your future career.

Don't be afraid to network
Social media is the most utilized form of communication in the 21st century, and employers are taking full advantage. Likewise, so should students on the verge of a job search. Twitter and Facebook are great for learning about potential openings at different companies, but these sites can also do more damage than good. Therefore, you should either maintain a professional profile on your account or increase your privacy settings. Another option would be to connect with industry professionals using a professional networking site like LinkedIn. Employers are much more likely to find you on LinkedIn, and it can greatly simplify the job search process.